Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Log In | Register

11 Pages «<891011>
The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
Kev the Modeller
#181 Posted : 14 August 2022 20:45:40

Rank: Master

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 1,214
Points: 3,665
Location: Southeast UK
More excellent modelling from you Robin, all looking very realistic and very detailed. Your photo #5 in post #179 underlines the very detailed nature of your build!

Very well done indeed and keep your updates coming. Cool Drool ThumpUp

Kev

Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#182 Posted : 21 August 2022 20:32:22

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,977
Points: 5,926
Location: Plympton
Many thanks indeed for those kind thoughts Kev!Blushing
Progressing along slowly at the minute as the attic workroom has been so hot recently (more expensive bottles of glue have gone solid in the heat!) Have just completed a major re-paint of the side radiators and I'm very pleased with how they've turned out - coming soon!BigGrin
Onwards....
The first task was to remove that moulded spigot from the rear of the plate as shown in Photo 1. With that done the plate was first airbrushed with Vallejo black primer and then the Vallejo Metal Colour Duraluminium. When dry, the little Frog tape mask was carefully removed to leave the plate looking as in Photo 2 (no replacement decal required!!Cool ). The next thing was to carefully apply the Humbrol Blue Grey Enamel Wash to the side legs of the plate to match up with the steering wheel arch washed previously. The difference between the plate and the legs can be seen in Photo 3. I now had to slightly alter the semi-circular cut outs in the top corners of the plate so that they would fit tightly up against the arch as shown in the test fit in Photo 4. As I mentioned last time, that locating spigot isn’t found on the real car, in actual fact the side legs of the plate are welded to the arch so I’d need a good accurate fit to be able to simulate that. Photo 5 shows the plate resting in place with the top tight against the arch and the bottom legs fitted over the moulded screw holes. By getting the fit perfect now I could first glue the simulated welds at the top and when set, screw the bottoms without putting any undue strain on the joints.
Photo 6 illustrates the actual joint on the real thing whilst Photos 7 and 8 show the little drops of steel epoxy glue prior to mixing together and the ‘welds’ applied to the plate/arch. As the glue set (rapidly) I used a cocktail stick to dab and prick the glue, sculpting it into a more realistic weld-looking join. Once the joint was set I could then put in the pair of screws to secure the bottom legs to the chassis top as seen in Photo 9. Later on I went back over the epoxy with Vallejo Chrome to tie in the grey joints to the overall metal colouring. After I had glued and screwed everything in place I realised that there was another little addition I could/should have added in! I realised too late that the top and bottom edges of the plate also have a row of rivets but there is nothing on the back of the plate to rivet onto. The frame behind the plate obviously has a crass bar at the top and bottom which only needed a thin strip of plasticard to glue on the back to represent - another one for future builders to consider!Blushing
Anyway, I could now finally join the engine to the rest of the chassis via the firewall bulkhead (a special note here – DON’T try a dry fit of the firewall to the chassis if you haven’t screwed it to the engine first – getting it back off is NOT easy!Blink ) First however, my many hours of pouring over the reference photos showed up a need for yet another hole to be drilled into the firewall! Photo 10 shows a pair of copper tubes and connectors running along the side of the engine. They are joined on to a pair of tubes or pipes which run back through a rubber grommited hole in the firewall (arrowed). The colour of the pipes is interesting – white and brown! If you think back to the brake cylinders on the front of the car, there was a pair of white and brown tubes coming off the cylinders and running through the chassis into that ‘box’ behind the foot pedals – I’m wondering if this is where they re-appear after running through the length of the chassis inside the double walls of the box construction! If so, they presumably carry on back to the rear brakes somewhere along the line. Anyway, after working out where that hole was to be found I first drilled it out as shown in Photo 11 and then, using a short length of rubber tube on a cocktail stick, super glued the outside of the rubber and slowly pushed it through the hole as seen in Photo 12. After a few seconds the cocktail stick was withdrawn leaving the rubber tube standing proud of the wall ready to accept the tubing much later on.
The engine and firewall are shown ready for joining together in Photo 13. This should have been done ages ago according to the instruction schedule (way back in section 3 in fact) but I just wanted to keep all that extra detailing I put on the end of the engine ‘gaze at able’ for as long as possible!Blushing The three raised screw points fit onto corresponding holes on the engine and are secured with three Type N screws, once tight the bulkhead with engine attached then fits inside the open end of the cockpit. Before that however it was time to work on the fire extinguisher control thingy as seen in Photo 14. There were some fairly prominent mould or flash lines around this one but once again, as I was re-painting it I could carefully sand down those before priming the piece matt black. The areas sanded back are marked with the arrows here. Not shown is the third part of the control – an ‘L’ shaped lever which push fits into that semi circle cut out seen in Photo 15. Here the control has been primed, airbrushed with Vallejo Metal Colour Duraluminium and toned down with Humbrol Blue Grey Enamel Wash. A couple of small holes were drilled into the end of the cylinder and three single strands of wire, two painted with Vallejo acrylic turquoise blue and one with acrylic red were glued in as shown. The actual thing is shown in Photo 16 and from what I can see, those wires go into a rubber sheath which joins on to the one coming from the electrical cut off cone up above the cockpit. So before joining the firewall onto the chassis a last fond look inside the cockpit in Photo 17. Note the two rectangular cut outs at bottom left and right, they’re important!
The engine/firewall is attached to the chassis with three Type P screws – two in the sides and one at the top. I should have put in the side screws first according to the instructions but I actually put the top one in first as seen in Photo 18. That might explain why I had to use the old blunt needle in the screw hole trick to align the side screws afterwards! The two side screws are shown in Photos 19 and 20, they pass through two projecting tabs on the rear of the firewall, which in turn slide down into those rectangular cut outs mentioned earlier.
Finally, the top screw is semi-disguised by the addition of the fire extinguisher control which is push fitted into the two holes seen above the screw location, as is shown in Photo 21. The transparent yellow tubing seen running below the extinguisher control (and down the left in Photo 20) will eventually be connected on to the left hand radiator, which is coming as soon as the weather gets a lot cooler!(All done and dusted now!)
In the meantime there’s just a couple of ‘boxes’ to be airbrushed and added to the chassis sides to bring the diary up to date with the build so far.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All and stay cool!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Front plate and firewall pic 1.JPG
Front plate and firewall pic 2.JPG
Front plate and firewall pic 3.JPG
Front plate and firewall pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
goddo
#183 Posted : 21 August 2022 22:12:21

Rank: Vice-Master
Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 21/04/2011
Posts: 850
Points: 2,564
Location: Buckinghamshire
This is all coming together into something spectacular.
Well done, sir.
Chris
roymattblack
#184 Posted : 22 August 2022 22:19:25

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 3,817
Points: 11,587
Location: ipswich
CRIKEY... Another mind-boggling update here.
Looking forward to seeing the final result.Love
Markwarren
#185 Posted : 23 August 2022 07:57:24

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Forum Support Team, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 5,984
Points: 18,233
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Very nice work Robin.Love Love

Mark
Kev the Modeller
#186 Posted : 23 August 2022 10:38:04

Rank: Master

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 1,214
Points: 3,665
Location: Southeast UK
Another cracking update Robin incorporating some wonderful detail. This model is going to look fantastic when it's complete and with the bodywork off to show that superb engine bay. Looking forward to that day.

Keep it coming. DroolThumpUp

Kev
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#187 Posted : 25 August 2022 21:24:05

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,977
Points: 5,926
Location: Plympton
Many thanks again to Chris, Roy, Mark and Kev!Blushing Blushing

This section concerns the radiators and so much went on with these that it turned into quite a big instalment - so I decided to split it into two parts!BigGrin
With the engine (or front half at least) now attached to the rest of the chassis, two things have become very apparent. First, I need to do a long over due clean up of my workbench – its still covered with lots of Sword Beach extra castings and quite a few of the Ferrari up-grade bits and pieces (and rubber moulds) and secondly, I’m going to need an A2 cutting mat soon for the photo backgrounds! This thing is getting BIG and I need more room!Blink
Anyhow, before I get down to that the next section as mentioned is to make up the radiators, which are mounted on the sides of the chassis. And before I can start them, there’s a couple of ‘boxes’ to add on first. These are quite a clever design in the overall kit build, they are actually a part of the overall chassis construction but by making them separate pieces they are used to cover up the two side screws holding the engine bay in placeCool . The left one does have some sort of inspection panel moulded on so something (possibly those rear brake pipes coming out the back) must be inside, the right one doesn’t, but has the coolant fluid tank hanging off the outside later.
Photos 1 and 2 show the left hand box before and after fitting (after the usual re-paint in Vallejo black primer and Duraluminium). This is a simple push fit like most of the kit with three spigots and holes to mate together, quite a bit of pressure was required to get the thing to ‘snap’ into place. Photos 3 and 4 show the same for the right hand box. This one has just two locators and pushed into place a little easier than the first. The three holes in this box are to locate that coolant tank mentioned earlier.
Now for those radiators. These are supplied in two packs, Pack 50 and Pack 51 as shown in Photos 5 and 6 respectively. Pack 50 is slightly more complicated than this photo suggests. In my haste I forgot to take this photo before I’d already started it and the radiator actually consists of five parts: a top and bottom grill section, a tiny oil line connector (the red thing at the bottom) and, already attached to the top grill here, a front and back edge piece. The right hand ‘double’ radiator in Pack 51 has four pieces: a top and bottom grill with the sides already a part of the top grill section, and a pair of pipe connectors which sit on the edge facing the chassis. I had already planned on re-painting the radiators which was handy as you can see in Photos 7, 8 and 9, the parts do have some quite noticeable flash lines. The grill finish on the model parts isn’t bad to be honest, on examining the reference photos on the real thing, some of them appeared almost black and others more silvery (the Tamiya instructions say to paint the whole radiator aluminium) and as you can see in Photos 10 and 11, this is actually correct. On the more distant photo the grill does appear to be considerably darker than the frame but this is due solely to the shadowing between the vanes, which, as is apparent in the close up, are all the same dull aluminium colour. This is the radiator off my dear brother’s ‘scrapping’ Range Rover currently sitting on my garage drive (and most of the flaming garden)!Cursing The double radiator has a row of circular indents along the front edge but as you can see in Photo 12, it should have a double row of similar indents along the outer edge too. The next instalment will be the story of how I managed to get that done (with a lot more work than I intended at first) and the re-painting of both of the radiators afterwards. I’ve since realised that when the bodywork goes on, all of that extra detail is covered up (which is probably why the manufacturers left it off in the first place)!Blink Still, that’s not the point is it? We are modellers are we not and we have to put it in! Keep telling me that PLEASE!Crying
Until then Happy Hidden Modelling to you All!BigGrin

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Radiators pic 1.JPG
Radiators pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Kev the Modeller
#188 Posted : 26 August 2022 20:37:09

Rank: Master

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 1,214
Points: 3,665
Location: Southeast UK
Nice work on those radiators Robin and slowly but surely you are getting ever closer to that finish line! I know that adding all of these little upgrades and scratchbuilt parts make that line seem ever further away, but boy will it be worth it in the end!

Keep up the good (neh, great) work Robin, looking forward to your next update already! Drool Cool ThumpUp

Kev

Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#189 Posted : 28 August 2022 21:23:45

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,977
Points: 5,926
Location: Plympton
Many thanks again Kev! As you'll see below, this instalment marks a milestone in the build! (And another will be when my workbench is cleared for action and ready to continue!!)Blushing Blushing Blushing

So, carrying on, Photo 13 shows the top or leading edge of the right hand radiator which is equipped with those circular indents mentioned last time. My first intention was to mark out the positions of the side indents and drill them out with a suitable standard drill bit, this is shown under way in Photo 14. The next stage was to then use the cylindrical diamond dust grinder which just happened to be the right size to ground out the conical drill hole, leaving a flat bottomed impression. There was no easy way to grip the radiator to allow this to be done by hand unfortunately (not without the risk of marring or damaging the plastic surface and detail) and so I was forced into trying to achieve the grinding with the Dremel type rotary tool. Unfortunately (again), although the tool has a speed control wheel it can’t go down to a low enough speed and all I ended up with was a rough melted base to the indent! Time for Plan B!Blink This involved going back to the hand drill again and drilling right through the side of the radiator. The size of the hole is 3mm and by chance, my multi diameter rotating leather hole punch has one of 3mm too! Photo 15 shows the 3mm disks being punched out of a scrap of thin plasticard. When first punched out, the disks have a domed appearance (I’ve just discovered a brilliant method of making large scale rivets – see the two on the left)Cool , the next job was to press the domed circle in a pair of mini flat jawed pliers to flatten the dome (third one along) and then to gently sand both faces on fine sandpaper to produce the flat disk on the right. In actual fact, the circumference of the disk is still sloped slightly so then I took the sharp conical diamond dust grinder and commenced to ‘countersink’ the 3mm holes in the side. I began just turning the grinder by hand but soon realised it was far more efficient (and easier on the thumb and fingers) to stick it in the larger hand drill as illustrated in Photo 16. With the holes now countersunk I could insert the disks with their chamfered edge the right way around and use a wooden dowel to gently push them down the hole until they were wedged in straight and level at the correct depth. A few had to be popped back out after going in too deep but once they were just right I used the Liquid Poly glue brush to dab a spot of glue on the inside of the disk to weld them to the sides as shown in Photo 17.
Photo 18 shows the completed line of indents together with the two outlets after having their flash lines sanded away and ready for their soapy sonic bath and airbrushing. The result of that is shown in Photos 19 and 20 after the coat of Vallejo Black Primer and a couple of thin coats of Vallejo Metal Colour Semi Matt Aluminium. Now for the actual ‘radiator’ part! I have a bottle of ‘The Army Painters Warpaints’ – Rough Iron, and initially I was going to try a diluted wash of that to get the shadowing effect but as I was putting the Semi Matt Aluminium back with the rest of the Metal Colour paints I suddenly remembered the Jet Exhaust colour I bought to help the depth shadowing in the driver’s cockpit so I decided to try that first. If it didn’t look too good I could re-airbrush the aluminium and start again. I tried a wash of about 5 – 6 drops of well shaken Jet Exhaust with a largish size 6 soft brush dipped twice in the clean water to dilute it down. The result was excellent (better than I expected actually) and as shown in Photo 21 it gave just the right darkening shadow whilst still maintaining that overall aluminium tint. After fitting the tops and bottoms together I went around the frames with thinned down Humbrol Blue Grey Enamel Wash to pick out the detail. Note! The single radiator was very difficult to press together and even now there is a slight ‘standing proud’ on one corner, fortunately its on the underside and not noticeable. The double radiator was also very tight and I decided to drill out the locating holes a bit and poly glue the bottom grill in place. As it happened the holes were enlarged only very slightly and the insert then snapped right into position perfectly – no need to glue at all. I would recommend thinking about drilling and gluing them both however – those holes seemed too tight for the pegs to me! The extra detail brought out by those side indents is very apparent in this shot (pity they will all be covered up by the side panels later!)Crying
Before fitting the left hand unit on I had to push fit the oil line connector into place as seen in Photo 23, (this is one fiddly piece to hold onto!) in the end I gripped it in the flat nosed pliers and ‘twiddled’ it into the hole! It is at a slight angle here but I learned it was better flat once the oil line was attached! There are three push fit attachment points on the left one, two on the chassis facing side and one on the extension piece that fits onto the side box. Photos 24 and 25 show the radiator in place and Photo 26 shows the oil line attached. This is NOT the oil line shown in the instructions however! In those, this tube is one of the long tubes coming off the top of that big blue oil filter on top of the engine block – doesn’t say which one and the other seems to go into the rear of the instrument cluster – I say seems as it is never actually mentioned in the instructions again after fitting it on all those instalments agoBlink . The one fitted on here is coming out of the firewall mounted oil expansion vessel, which passes along the firewall, behind the alternator and down the left side of the chassis. I currently know where one of the others vanishes into, the rest of them hmm!BigGrin
The right hand double radiator only has two locating positions on the chassis wall, however it does get a third ‘strut’ later which runs over the top of the grill to the chassis top edge. This one is shown fitted on in Photos 27 and 28, the fit was pretty good on both of these, not too tight to push in but a positive firm hold afterwards. Finally, in Photo 29, a shot of both of the radiators in place. The next task is to make up the coolant fluid tank which connects into the right hand radiator, but at this point, not only has the build caught up with the diary, but this is the end of section 6, the coolant tank begins section 7 and that makes me exactly half way through the build!Cool
Until the next time, (second half) Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.





Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Radiators pic 3.JPG
Radiators pic 4.JPG
Radiators pic 5.JPG
Radiators pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
admin
#190 Posted : 29 August 2022 05:52:25
Rank: Administration


Groups: Administrator, Administrators

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 1,777
Points: 5,444
Location: Nevada, US
This is really a masterpiece!

Best,

Mark
“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

Marcus Aurelius
goddo
#191 Posted : 29 August 2022 08:43:38

Rank: Vice-Master
Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 21/04/2011
Posts: 850
Points: 2,564
Location: Buckinghamshire
Inspirational write up, expertly photographed.
Beautiful workmanship.
Well done.
Chris
roymattblack
#192 Posted : 30 August 2022 11:47:14

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 3,817
Points: 11,587
Location: ipswich
I'm really enjoying what you are doing here.
Absolutely top notch stuff.

Roy
Kev the Modeller
#193 Posted : 31 August 2022 21:26:34

Rank: Master

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 1,214
Points: 3,665
Location: Southeast UK
Excellent work all round as usual Robin and looking really good now, lots of detail to look at?! Hard to believe that you are only halfway through this build? I thought it was at least two thirds now that the engine is finished and attached to the firewall? Going to be amazing when it's finished!

I recall that you said this was the first proper car model that you'd built, but I get the impression that you are enjoying this very much and I bet that it won't be your last?! BigGrin ThumpUp

Kev

Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#194 Posted : 13 September 2022 20:35:18

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,977
Points: 5,926
Location: Plympton
Many and grateful thanks again to Mark, Chris, Roy and Kev for their kind words!Blushing
I am really enjoying the build as you can rightly tell Kev, I think when you come down to it I'd probably enjoy any build that can be 'personalised' with up-grades and improvements like this one! The thing that really surprised me was just how 'hand made' these F1 cars are - there's none of the mass produced neat and tidy approach as you get in the commercial vehicles - moulded conduits for wiring? forget that! Run them from A to B and bung in some cable ties and duct tape to stop them flapping about!BigGrin Judging from the reference photos, no two cars of the same type and model are actually identical - some run cables and oil lines here and another sticks them out of the way somewhere else! Means more research but gives a lot more leeway in what you can get away with!Cool Flapper
Anyway....
As mentioned in the last instalment, the next part to make up is the radiator coolant tank, the components for which come in Pack 52 as shown in Photo 1. The tank itself comes in two halves, one of which has the pipe attached, together with a second pipe. As you can see in Photo 2, both the pipe sections have some noticeable flash lines which will have to be removed, and both the pipes also have a moulded on jubilee clip shown in Photos 3 and 4 which will also be removed for a better looking add-on version. If it wasn’t for the flash lines I would have left the pipes in the manufacturers ‘chrome’ finish to differentiate them from the duller aluminium of the radiators. I chose to apply a thin bead of Revell Contacta poly glue around the edges of the tank before pressing the two halves together and once dry, proceeded to sand down the flash lines along the pipes. Some of the reference photos show the filler cap on the top of the tank as having a set of four holes or depressions in the plastic cap as shown in Photo 5 (one of the photos also has the tool to remove said cap laying on the tank as well – it looks just like a larger version of the bottom bracket removal tool in my cycle maintenance tool set – yes, the one I managed to snap one of the pins off!Cursing ) The first job was to drill out those four holes with the mini drill vice as seen in Photo 6 – the holes aren’t actually as big as that, I slightly countersunk (countersank?) the holes to clean up the edges and like most of this kit, the plastic is black under that chrome paint finish! Photo 7 shows the bottom of the tank after sanding down the joint and the pipe flash. It was then airbrushed with Vallejo Black Primer followed by Vallejo Air Chrome acrylic. Once that had dried overnight I used the Humbrol Blue-Grey Enamel Wash with a very small brush to flow the wash around the raised weld lines on the top and sides of the tank as well as the details on the pipe connectors. This is shown in Photo 8 and a closer shot in Photo 9, which also shows the plastic filler cap painted in Vallejo acrylic Ivory.
The tank was then attached to the bodywork by press fitting as seen in Photo 10. This was a difficult process – the pins and holes are a very tight fit and it’s not easy to get the tank in flat to the chassis. Once I’d started I couldn’t get the thing back off again and if I was doing it again I would drill out those holes a little and poly glue the tank into place instead of press fitting it on! Before fitting the tank in place, the new jubilee clip was made from thin aluminium sheet with the ratchet holes embossed by pounce wheel before cutting the thin strip out, curling it around the pipe and super gluing it in position. A tiny length of aluminium micro tube was then cut off and glued in place for the tightening screw, illustrated in Photo 11.
The joint on the upper pipe is a bit of a nightmare! It even looks pretty rough on the official build photos, it is essentially a half butted joint which leaves a nasty joint/gap between the two halves as shown in Photo 14. Fortunately, some of the reference photos show this joint to be covered by a wrap around something (possibly asbestos?) so that would allow me to cover the joint up without having to fill/sand/paint after fixing it together. Photo 12 shows my ‘asbestos’ patch – a strip of DecraLed adhesive lead cut to the right width and then rolled down over a course piece of sandpaper to create the ‘material’ texture. This was then painted with Vallejo Sky Grey acrylic and when dry a steel rod was positioned down the centre and gently hammered along to create the depression for the jubilee clip to sit in as shown in Photo 13. Photo 15 illustrates the concealing wrap around which was super glued into place followed by the aluminium jubilee clip to finish it off.
Photo 16 shows both the pipes in place, connecting the right hand radiator to both the engine block and the coolant tank.
With the pipes in place it was then time to clean up the loose tubes and cable seen on the right in the last photo. My first intention was to join the pair of oil lines back to their other halves coming off the big blue oil filter with a short length of black rubber tubing – however I suddenly thought up a much neater method! Photo 17 shows the raw material for the joiners – some clear plastic sprue (probably from the 1/72 Airfix Spitfires in the Scramble diorama). As shown, the corner section was snipped off and stretched over the candle flame to produce the filament shown at the bottom. The two wider ends up where the sprue begins to stretch were then cut off and inserted into the ends of the clear/yellow stained vinyl tubing as shown in Photo 18, a drop of thin super glue securing the clear ‘pin’ in place. The other end of the tubing was then slid over the clear sprue and another drop of super glue fixing the two halves together with a nearly invisible join. Before joining them together however, I’d cut three rubber bands from the larger rubber tubing and slid them over the two yellow oil lines. After the lines were joined I could then insert a needle nosed pair of tweezers into the bands, the spring in the tweezers opening up the band as seen in Photo 19. As Photo 20 shows, whilst the band was kept open, I could then thread the black cable through, pulling it taut and then simply removing the tweezers to join all three tubes/cable together. This was repeated with the other two bands, leaving the entire run down the right hand side joined as shown in Photo 21. On some reference photos, that’s all there is for the cable run but on a couple there is a bolted on metal clip to secure the lines at the rear of the chassis. I couldn’t leave that off (it does help to keep everything where it should be) so I cannibalised one of the failed brake fluid tank cradles and fitted that on as shown in Photo 22. It already had a drilled hole at the end and I just had to make a pilot hole in the plastic chassis body and then use one of the spectacle screws and screw it down to fix the clip in place.
There was one more piece of pipe routing to carry out on the section – one that I’d been looking forward to for some time – I had such fun creating it that I’ll keep that one back for a nice short instalment coming next!BigGrin (Plus the fact that I’m up to my ears in trying to find a missing tool in the conservatory that has resulted in loads of tools (and junk) piled up on the worktop out there which is just where I have the airbrushing station set up! I don’t even need that tool at the moment – its just really annoying me where it’s gone!)Cursing
So anyway, until the next instalment, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.




Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Radiator Pipes pic 1.JPG
Radiator Pipes pic 2.JPG
Radiator Pipes pic 3.JPG
Radiator Pipes pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#195 Posted : 18 September 2022 08:42:58

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Forum Support Team, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 5,984
Points: 18,233
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Just catching up with your build Robin, again an excellent update. This is not just a great build, but a great in sight to how these were built. Excellent stuff.Love Love

Mark
admin
#196 Posted : 21 September 2022 17:03:33
Rank: Administration


Groups: Administrator, Administrators

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 1,777
Points: 5,444
Location: Nevada, US
This is looking amazing, Robin! Keep it up!

Best,

Mark
“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

Marcus Aurelius
Plymouth57
#197 Posted : 21 September 2022 18:00:07

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,977
Points: 5,926
Location: Plympton
Many thanks again to the two Marks for their kind words! A nice short one for this instalment!BigGrin

So, the part I’ve been looking forward to involves one of the oil lines coming off the upgraded oil expansion vessel. As you might remember, this little drum thing received five extra outputs each with a flexible oil tube (in the kit, its not actually attached to anything – it just sits there on the firewall!Blink ) One of the oil lines has already been accounted for, this is the one running down the left to the radiator, now it was time for the only other one that has photo evidence of going somewhere, (even if not all the photos actually agree!)
Photo 23 shows a close up of the expansion vessel on the real thing. The red connector hidden under the ‘23’ is the one leading off to the radiator mentioned above, the one I’m interested in now is just above that, coming off the neck of the filler cap. This one actually loops around just out of the picture, coming back down just over half way up the photo where it then drops down into a blue plastic corrugated pipe or conduit. Where it goes from there I have no idea so a little ‘speculation’ was indulged in for this one. Since it was vanishing down the side of the coolant tank I thought going into that was as good a place as any (probably means my Ferrari would blow up on ignition but what the heck!)BigGrin
I had a few ideas about creating the corrugated pipe – thought about a bendy plastic straw but the bendy part of the ones I had wasn’t long enough (plus Mum needs them all for her cups of tea!) I eventually decided on making a wire coil and hopefully, using a suitable tube of blue heat shrink to mould around it giving the rings effect. The little gizmo to make the coils is shown in Photo 24, a craft item made by a company called “Artistic Wire” called a Coiling Gizmo (ebay as usual). It is normally used to produce decorative wire coils for craft jewellery and I was trying to remember what I actually got it for when I remembered – for 1/700 scale barbed wire on the Sword Beach diorama! I actually used the smallest of the formers, not the third one up shown here, the wire is looped around the ‘U’ of the handle which is then turned, coiling the wire around the shaft like a spring. The first attempt with the heat shrink is shown at the top in Photo 25 with the ‘raw’ spring directly below it. Unfortunately, the heat shrink didn’t shrink down enough to give the ring definition needed for the tube, I'd forgotten that the thickness of the heat shrink wrap actually increases as the circumference shrinks down, the thicker it got, the less definition the coil rings would have – you can just make it out in the photo but it wasn't ‘ringed’ enough. The bottom one was the actual corrugated tube used in the end, I went back to the copper plated aluminium wire used on the brake fluid plumbing up the front (shown before painting in Photo 26).
I gave the bent tube a good coat of brush applied Vallejo Grey Primer and when that was dry filled in the gaps on the bend with a cocktail stick applied blob of Micro Kristal Klear, normally used to make tiny clear windows but used here to fill in the gaps in the coils. When that dried another good thick coat of Vallejo Light Turquoise was applied followed later by a Turquoise and matt white mix, dry brushed on to pick out the rings. After cutting off the end of the coil at the ‘bottom end’ (and subsequently trimming down the top end a bit too), the bottom was glued to the underside of the coolant tank with steel epoxy, using an offcut of the heat shrink to prop up the tube against the tank until set as shown in Photo 27. The top of the coil/tube was then super glued against the side of the tank (Photo 28) before the oil tube from the expansion vessel was looped around and simply threaded down inside as seen in Photo 29.
So that’s two down and three more to hide away somewhere if I can’t find any clues in the reference material!
In the next instalment it’s back to the left hand radiator to add in that one’s pipe work!
Until then Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.

PS. I have to apologise to the manufacturers of this kit for some of the 'missing bits' pointed out compared to the smaller Tamiya version! Now that I have finally gone through all of the instructions (just to see what's coming and when) I found that some (though not all by any means) of the missing parts do in fact appear in the final stages of construction! For example, that extra tube coming off the fire extinguisher and running down into the driver's cockpit - it does appear right at the end - but you have to cut it off the oil line coming off the big blue oil filter, after removing said oil line from the instrument panel and then re-attaching it back on minus the extinguisher pipe! (Not the best solution when you've already stained the tubing to look like its carrying oil or petrol!LOL ) Also included at the end is some aluminium self adhesive tape to make 'tidying-up' brackets for the cables. As I'm doing these as I go there will be some 'Done that, been there' towards the end!Cool
So sorry Centauria and see you all soon!Blushing Blushing Blushing



Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Radiator Pipes pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#198 Posted : 22 September 2022 11:10:52

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 3,817
Points: 11,587
Location: ipswich
Yet another brilliant update.
This just keeps getting better and better.Love
Plymouth57
#199 Posted : 29 September 2022 17:40:20

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,977
Points: 5,926
Location: Plympton
Many thanks for that Roy! Greatly appreciated as always.Blushing
At the moment I'm doing a little back-tracking, as you'll see in the following instalment, I've just made up the 'brains' of the Ferrari's engine, the ECU which has involved a great deal of extra work! Part of that upgrade involved doing away with the cables running from the instruments to the ECU (3 of them) and making up a more realistic bundle (9 - 12 of them). I'm still awaiting a set of micro drills in order to drill out a new plug (somehow, I seem to have lost (broken) all the smallest ones!Blink Blushing ) but apart from that the unit is completed. In the process I hit upon a way of adding in the multiple cable runs from the vinyl tubing (its not vinyl anymore)Cool and that's led on to a re-think on the rest of the cabling - see this space!BigGrin
Anyway, here's the other set of radiator pipes...
The left hand radiator pipe work comes, as you can see in Pack 53, along with the last part of the right hand assembly – the supporting tie rod shown at the top, (Photo 30). The two pipes had the usual flash lines so they had to be sanded down and re-painted (which I would have had to do any way to match them up with the other side), but the little tie rod was pretty good so I left that one in the kit chrome effect and simply blue grey enamel washed the two detailed nuts at the top and bottom as seen in Photos 31 and 32. The rectangular tab at the bottom was a little too tight for my liking and the rod was bending quite a bit with the effort to push the tab in so for safety’s sake I filed the tab down a little and glued it into the slot instead. The top peg fitted much easier and I’ve left that one unglued for the moment – I’m not exactly sure how the body work which encases the radiators fits in there and these instructions have a habit of suddenly telling you to remove a part to fit on another, way down the build schedule!Blink Better safe than sorry! Photo 33 illustrates the tie rod in position, joining the edge of the radiator to the chassis.
After the standard priming and airbrushing with Vallejo Air Chrome, both of the pipes were fitted with jubilee clips at the radiator ends as shown in Photo 34. The inner pipe was fitted first (although I believe the instructions were for the outer first), the radiator end was first push fitted into the socket as seen in Photo 35 and then the other end was carefully flexed to bring the opposite locating peg into contact with the hole in the engine block under the big black oil filter as shown in Photo 36. Once in place this was a tight fit requiring no glue. The outer pipe went in the other way around, after some Blue Grey enamel wash on the big hexagonal nut connector seen in Photo 37 and inserted in Photo 38, the other end was flexed until it engaged in the slanted opening shown in Photo 39. This one was a bit of a looser fit, if one end was in flush, the other wanted to pop out slightly so I eventually glued both ends in, one at a time, supporting the pipe until the last one was set in place.
Photo 40 shows both the pipes in place, the difference between the semi matt aluminium of the radiators and the chrome of the pipes showing up nicely here.
In the next instalment, we come to another part which I have been really looking forward to getting to grips with, its all but completed now and I’m glad to say the improvement over the bland kit part is worth all the effort! Coming next is the engine ECU computer with the two support struts linking the engine bay to the chassis.
Until then Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Radiator Pipes pic 6.JPG
Radiator Pipes pic 7.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#200 Posted : 30 September 2022 10:54:10

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 3,817
Points: 11,587
Location: ipswich
More stunning work.
You're clearly enjoying the project. Keep it coming.Love
Users browsing this topic
Guest (2)
11 Pages «<891011>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.385 seconds.
DeAgostini