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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
delboy271155
#281 Posted : 14 May 2023 18:25:58
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Hi Robin, BigGrin

Another fabulous update Cool , looks like you heading to the finish line at a pace now.


Well done.


Regards
delboy271155
(Derek)
COME BACK GUY FAWKES "YOUR COUNTRY NEEDS YOU"






Markwarren
#282 Posted : 19 May 2023 09:57:57

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Hi Robin
Just catching up on your latest episodes. To get this level of accuracy on any model, you have to have a very good modelling mind, and you’ve got heaps of that. The cotton wool tip for replicating fibre glass is pure genius, and it looks absolutely spot on. This build alone is a great lesson for any modeller regardless of their skills.
Well done. Love Love

Mark
Plymouth57
#283 Posted : 20 May 2023 20:24:51

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Sincere thanks again to Derek and Mark for their kind words! In the real world she is almost there now, I had a couple of 'items' to put right as you'll see later and the big die-cast body shell had a lot of 'extras' added but essentially she just needs her front and rear wings to go on but before that I need to do a full set of finished gallery shots before those wings get in the way of the shots!
That fibreglass effect is I think the best thing I've come up with on this model, it's a very simple procedure but the difference it makes to the 'look' of the vehicle is well worth the effort. Hopefully it will be a help to other car modellers too as you said Mark - I've certainly learned so much tackling a genre I hadn't really considered much before (apart from the old Airfix 1/32 scale classic cars I built in my youth - remember them?)
Anyway, it's a shortie this time...!BigGrin

As mentioned last time, there was one more little detail to add to complete the first stage of the side pods. Although it’s difficult to make it out clearly in Photo 41, the arrow is indicating a metal strut or rod, which is screwed into the upper fibreglass panel and secures it to the lower one. This one is almost black but some other shots of other T4’s show it to be a dull aluminium, (probably a replacement part) so to let it stand out a little more I went with the lighter version! This was very easily made from a 1mm aluminium micro tube. The lip of the top panel was carefully drilled through at the same location as on the real vehicle and the tube pushed down through until the end rested on the bottom panel. I then marked the top edge with a pencil line, removed the tube and cut it to size by rolling the mark under the safety razor blade until it sliced off. The cut tube was then pushed back down through the hole and a few mm short of the bottom a small drop of super glue gel was added on the end before pushing it all the way down (ensuring it was still vertical when it reached the bottom of course)! The result is shown in Photo 42.
Photos 43 and 44 illustrate the way the bottom of the lower panels are shaped to go around the exhaust pipes. This is another very tight fit which is why I didn’t texture these areas, but it does show how the forward pipes are directed into the space between the side panels whilst the rear set run underneath the panel bottom before curving up to the side of the gearbox. Photo 45 shows her back on the supports again, displaying the entire underside, this is the position she was in as I tightened up those four flanged screws into the rods to hold everything on nice and secure.
The final two photos, 46 and 47, are just for those who like drooling over model F1 engines (as I am increasingly doing myself I must admit!)BigGrin The engine bay section is now complete and the next task is to add on the external side panels with the ground effect skirts – a simple exercise – except I went and altered them too!Blink

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Side Panels pic 10.JPG
Engine bay upper complete pic.JPG
Engine bay underside complete pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#284 Posted : 27 May 2023 19:36:47

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The aforementioned side skirts come in Packs 92 and 93 as shown in Photos 1 and 2. Now you might notice there is a ‘slight’ difference between the skirts in those two photos! This is one section where you can (in theory) put the parts on and take them off again – I didn’t actually test that to the limit though as I didn’t push the outer panels on fully until I needed to and I haven’t tried removing them since!Blink The kit colours are shown in Photo 1 with the ground effect skirt in black with a silver strip and brackets along the bottom. I tried test fitting the parts on but wasn’t very pleased with the overall effect – they fitted on beautifully but that black skirt completely vanishes into the natural shadow at the base of the car. During the collecting of reference material however, I came across many photos of the 312 with a white coloured ground effect skirt instead of the black one. Although the picture in Photo 3 is of Jodie Scheckter’s number 11 T4, there were also many of Giles’ number 12 as well so I decided to alter the kit skirts to the white version for a better ‘look’ to the sides.
Just as a coincidence, Jodie’s car is fitted with that horrible, ugly rain version of the rear aerofoil which might give some idea of why I’m NOT building that thing (which takes up most of the final Phase 12 of the build instructions) – so there!BigGrin
The re-paint was really easy – I simply sprayed the black plastic with a matt white car primer, a couple of coats was all it needed and then I touched in the bottom metal rim and the brackets with Vallejo Chrome acrylic by hand. Only the front face was sprayed white, partly for convenience so I could lay the skirt down flat to dry and partly because the inner facing part is completely hidden under the car anyway.
Photo 4 shows the left hand skirt in place with the outer panel laying face down in front. The skirt is attached by two counter sunk screws, the barrels of which press into cylindrical sockets in the side panels, the screw holes are arrowed in Photo 5, the outer panels are press fitted onto the same lower side panels with four pegs and sockets, three along the top and one at the front. Photos 7 and 8 (yes I know! I don’t know where Photo 6 went either!Blushing ), shows both the skirts and panels fitted on. As I said, I didn’t test fit the panels on fully and there was a nice ‘click’ when the last peg went home so I’m just assuming they would come off again with some levering.
As you can see here, those white skirts show up much better than the black version and show just how close to the ground those things actually come. I’m not sure if they are fixed on the real car or not, some of the earlier shots of the skirts seem to show a kind of lever system to allow the skirts to go up and down depending on the road surface, maybe these ones did the same?
Anyway, in the following instalment it’s on to the biggest and heaviest component of the whole kit – the upper body shell. A simple piece to add in the instructions – but then again – it IS made of fibreglass isn’t it!BigGrin
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Side Skirts pic 1.JPG
Side Skirts pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#285 Posted : 09 June 2023 19:52:41

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So we finally come to the largest and heaviest part in the entire kit – which is quite ironic really as the actual piece on the real car is as light as a feather!BigGrin BigGrin This is the entire body shell of the Ferrari, which is a single die-cast metal moulding and comes in Pack 100 along with the bodywork decals, the push in catches which clip the shell onto the chassis in the real thing and a set of screws. The reason I’ve jumped out of the kit schedule from Pack 93 to 100 is that the preceding packs contain the bits which fit on to the body, such as the wing mirrors and cockpit inner sides. However, as I’m altering the inside of the body shell (considerably) I needed to complete this part before the other bits went on.
Photos 1 to 4 illustrate just how lightweight this bodywork piece is – the whole thing is made of fibreglass (hint, hint) and can be lifted up and positioned over the chassis by just a couple of pit crew. As you can see in Photos 1 and 2, in the pits it is often just left propped up against a convenient wall whilst the car is being worked on. I suspect in Photo 3 it has just been removed and is being lifted away whilst in Photo 4 it is being moved into position to replace it back on the car. I often wondered how the driver’s got into the seat over that flimsy shell – looks like they get in first and the car is completed around or over them!Blink
Interestingly there are some little differences in the various T4’s shells, in 1 and 2 the driver’s headrest is part of the anti-roll framework as it is in this kit, but 3 and possibly 4 have that headrest attached to the body shell instead! There is actually a double page photo in the Haines Manual showing a single member of the pit crew holding up the shell on his own with a team mate on the other side of the car studying something else entirely using a single free hand to steady the shell from any wind blowing it away! It wouldn’t surprise me if this die-cast part weighed about the same as the real thing!BigGrin
Before starting the body shell there was a little thing to fix first. If you remember, I was thinking that there might have been some warping in the side panels, which caused the problem with the metal rods passing through the body and chassis. Photo 5 shows the top panel where it fits over the right hand radiator and as you can see, it’s not completely flat along the join! The left hand radiator join on the other hand was absolutely tight so it looks like the slight warp was in the right hand panel alone. This was fixed pretty easily by applying some small drops of super glue gel via cocktail stick under the panel edge and then applying a ratchet clamp to hold it down until the glue had set. After that there was no gap and everything looked fine.
The first test fit is shown in Photo 6. The first thing I discovered was that the fire extinguisher tube that I’d glued to the driver’s seat had to be ‘dislodged’ as it has to feed in over the rear of the shell behind the cockpit! (Must edit the relevant part of the diary for that one!) There is a slight gap around the join of the shell and side panels but each corner does go flat with some downward pressure so there shouldn’t be too much bother with screwing the shell down for the final finished gallery photos. After that the shell will be just left sitting on top.
Photo 7 shows the contents of Packs 94 and 95, which contain the cockpit internal walls and their associated screws. The positions for those screws can be seen clearly in Photo 8, which shows the walls fitted over the threaded pillars without the screws. There is a slot at the front and rear of each wall and if you ensure that the ends are in the slots first, the screw ‘outriggers’ will clip into position over the pillars quite nicely. After they had been fitted on properly I discovered another bit of detail in the reference photos so out they came again for some added work! There was one little area that needed some additional work on the main shell however, despite the ‘should fit ok’ from above! Photo 9 shows the rear of the shell where it joins up to the end of the fuel tank. It was necessary to use a round file and file out a semi circular channel under the edge to allow the rubber tubed electrical wires to fit under the body, the channel is easier to see in the insert photo in the top left. This wiring wasn’t included in the basic kit of course so the bodywork doesn’t allow for it being there.
After test fitting the cockpit sides I had a better idea of which parts of the shell would be too tight to apply the fibre glassing to so I began with the front left section (actually the front right when it’s the right way up) as shown in Photo 10. By Photo 11 the entire left hand side has been given the cotton wool with the top left and front sections having been second coated with the polyurethane varnish. I could have worked back from front to back equally but I wanted to get a ‘before and after’ shot to show the difference. This is shown in Photo 12 with the right hand side still bare painted metal and the left having been varnished, and then painted with Revell Aqua Color (I wish they’d spell it right!Flapper ) Italian Red. Interestingly, I found this one in the local Antics model shop and although it says Italian Red on the bottle label it actually says Ferrari Red on the till receipt! After the paint was dry (pretty quickly considering it’s a gloss), the texture was dry brushed with the Mig Sandgrau acrylic and Army Painter Flesh Wash used to shadow the base of the ridges and depressions in the moulding.
In Photo 13, both sides have been fully textured, however, the near side is painted and dry-brushed whilst the far side is simply the effect of the second coat of clear varnish. As you can see, you could probably get away with that if you didn’t want to add the extra shading and highlighting. At this point I decided to add another departure to the official paint scheme. This model in its basic form is based on the example in the Ferrari museum and the underside of the rear side wings is the same Ferrari Red as the top surface. However on some of the reference photos the underside of those wings is painted black as in the example shown in Photo 14, (seen above the exhaust pipe). I painted the relevant section with Mig Satin Black (must get some matt black one day) as shown in Photo 15 followed with the sandgrau dry brushing which really picks out the fibre glass texture in this shot.
Photo 16 illustrates both the side cockpit walls after some ‘grubby-ing up’ using some mid grey pastel chalk rubbed onto a finger and then transferred to the pristine white finish on the plastic. This is especially useful on the right hand side to deepen the shadows in that oval depression giving it more depth. Finally in Photo 17 we have a close up of the cockpit with the sides in place. As I mentioned earlier, I then discovered (or more accurately noticed) another small addition to those sides which will give more authenticity in the final appearance.
That will be coming in the following instalment along with the radiator grills and the rear view mirrors (fun and games with those two I can tell you!)Blink
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Body shell pic 1.JPG
Body shell pic 2.JPG
Body shell pic 3.JPG
Body shell pic 4.JPG
Body shell pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#286 Posted : 11 June 2023 09:17:57

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Amazing work, this really should be in a museum.Love Love

Mark
Plymouth57
#287 Posted : 25 June 2023 18:20:01

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Sincerest thanks for that Mark, whenever museums are mentioned, that's high praise indeed!Blushing Blushing Blushing
Apologies for the delay in this post, heatwaves and attic workrooms do NOT mix well!Blink Crying (Remembering to get up there each morning and open the skylight up full is bad enough!BigGrin )

Both of the radiator grill covers come in Pack 99 as shown in Photo 18. The photos I have of the outer body shell nearly all show the many bolt heads around the edges of these covers to be either shiny metal or chrome so the only upgrade needed for these two pieces was to carefully pick out those bolts with a tiny drop of Vallejo Chrome acrylic, (a couple of them had to be wiped off and re-done when the cocktail stick wobbled) but eventually they ended up as seen in Photo 19. As Photo 20 illustrates, the fitting of the grills is a simple push fit with four protruding pins on the grills fitting into four holes in the die cast body shell. These required quite some force to push completely home – whilst all the time desperately avoiding those newly painted chrome bolts! As you can see in Photos 21 and 22, they give a nice flush finish once they’re in and thankfully still allow quite a bit of the radiator surface detail to show up through.
Zipping back to pack 100 with the big metal body, what you also get in this pack is illustrated in Photo 23 – namely a decal sheet with two versions of Giles’ Number 12 to be added to the nose of the body and also a set of push on catches for the sides of the body and another pair for the rear brake air scoops. These are shown again in close up in Photo 24. I haven’t used the decals yet, but I’ll be going with the pair of solid white numbers applied on both sides of the nose (it looks more impressive!) From what I can make out on the reference photos and some youtube videos, those catches rotate around the silver bolt with the ‘handle’ being vertical when the body is placed in position and turned down to the horizontal to lock the thing down (not sure how the red ones on the air scoop go though). Photo 25 shows the location point on the die cast body with a catch fitted on in the lower section. Of the six catches, four of them fitted on easily, clicking into position. The other two were a little harder! In the end I was forced to drill out the locating holes very slightly to get the pins to fit and then to add a drop of superglue to keep them in place. As the catches are identical plastic pieces, I would guess that the red and white paint was a little thicker in those holes, which squashed the pins so they couldn’t pass through! Anyhow, Photo 26 shows the side catch on the left rear and Photo 27, the air scoop, again on the left. Don’t forget the body shell isn’t screwed down here, hence the gaps in both photos. Since taking these pictures, I went back and added some blue-black enamel wash around the silver bolt and the two raised things at the front of the catches to add some depth to it.
The next section was a right mess up! These were the two rear view mirrors, which came in Packs 96 and 97 as shown in Photo 28.
Test fitting the two mirror fairings proved pretty straightforward, a fair amount of pressure is required to get them to go down completely flat and since I still had to get the glasses on I didn’t want to hear that final click which meant they wouldn’t be coming off again just yet!Blink Photo 29 illustrates the right hand fairing in place. I can’t for the life of me remember, if that silver bolt in the recess up front was already there or if I added it with a drop of Vallejo Chrome, (I checked the build instruction pics but none of them show the thing clearly enough to tell)! Anyway, if it wasn’t on the original part it does need to be added as it does appear in the real life photos. The fixing method for the ‘glass; mirrors is not one that I especially liked – the mirrors are made from clear styrene with a mirrored silver backing and a double sided tape on the back face. The tape is pretty strong to be honest which would have been fine if the mirror was being stuck to a flat surface. Unfortunately I didn’t photograph the ‘bare’ inside of the fairing, but instead of the flat surface, the inside is composed of a raised lattice, which means that only a tiny part of the sticky rear of the mirror is in contact with the fairing. I found that although the first (left hand) mirror went on OK, it was very easy to dislodge it again when fitting the fairing on to the body shell. At least the left one looked right, when it came to the right hand mirror, something didn’t look correct. As you can see in Photo 30, when the mirror was stuck in place, there was a gap in the bottom left corner! It took me a while to figure out the reason with multiple removals and re-attachments in case I’d done something wrong but it turned out to be a supply problem – the kit had supplied me with a left and right mirror fairing but then complimented them with two left hand mirrors! As illustrated in Photo 31, when the mirror was put in back to front, it fitted perfectly! My first decision was to see if the double sided tape would come off without damaging the mirror surface so I could simply reverse the part. As it happened, yes it would! Photo 32 shows the sticky tape half way through the removal. It came off pretty well but left some sticky residue which spoiled the otherwise pristine reflective finish. This was where great idea number one came unstuck (sorry, that was NOT intentionalBigGrin ). I tried to rub off the residue with a cotton bud moistened with white spirit – and that promptly removed the silvering from the clear plastic! The only thing to do now was to make up an entirely new mirror after sending off for an A5 sheet of mirrored plasticard. Photo 33 shows what the white spirit did to the original. I used that as a template to pencil around on a sheet of scrap plasticard (just to make sure I could get a replacement piece to fit in the fairing), that trial one is seen on the right with the outline of the replacement seen drawn in the very corner of the mirrored plasticard. I then sliced off that outline on a narrow strip before progressively slicing off the excess and finally sanding the edges smooth. It took a couple of goes as I found the sanding could pull off the mirroring if done too aggressively. In actual fact, the new mirror glasses do have a slight border effect around their edges, which I like! The effect is to make the mirrored plastic look more like glass than plastic!Cool
I had intended to simply make up the new right hand mirror but as it happened I had to make a left hand replacement too. You remember I mentioned that the fixing surface for the glass was a lattice and not a flat surface? Well, I decided to make the bonding a little more positive by adding a film of super glue gel over the lattice – Photo 34 shows the result!Cursing The super glue reacted with the double sided tape and burned right through the tape and the mirror effect ending up with the damage shown in the photo. It wasn’t instantaneously though and took a few minutes to realise what had happened (by which time the glue had set of course). Ah well, live and learn, I won’t try that again! Photo 35 shows the replaced mirror on the left side, sorry about the focus, there’s a lot of reflective surfaces coming together now and the digital camera close up setting doesn’t like it! The final addition to the cockpit area is illustrated in Photo 36. This is the real thing (although I had to double check it!) As you can see indicated by the arrow, there are a series of six white ‘lumps’ running along the top of the white interior panel which are, I believe simply those little white polythene screw head caps available from any DIY store! It appears that the interior panels are simply screwed or bolted onto the main red fibre glass body and these caps just tidy up the fixings - it IS a Ferrari after all. After comparing the photo with the panel in place I marked each location by pencil and drilled out the panel as seen in Photo 37. The holes were 1.5mm diameter to be able to push in a styrene rod of the same size as shown in Photo 38. I pushed the rod through until it protruded the right distance inside and then marked the rod on the outside up against the panel. Removed it, and then cut it off at the mark, pushed it back in (the inside face was slightly rounded with gentle sanding) and finally added a drop of super glue behind to fix it in place. As you can see in the final Photo 39, each cap is matched with a twin above as on the real car. These are much shorter pieces of rod, which are carefully super glued straight on to the metal red body.
In the next instalment, adding the final piece of the body section – the windscreen together with a change for the hub caps!
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Body shell pic 6.JPG
Body shell pic 7.JPG
Body shell pic 8.JPG
Body shell pic 9.JPG
Body shell pic 10.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#288 Posted : 26 June 2023 11:47:26

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Yet another amazing update.
Almost finished now. Looking forward to seeing it all sorted.Love
Plymouth57
#289 Posted : 03 July 2023 21:06:33

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Many thanks for that Roy!
To be honest, she IS completed (well virtually), all I have to do is make up the two supports for displaying the body shell and finally screw on the front wing and push fit on the rear one. However! I've decided to work on a sort of index to include after the final instalment to indicate for everyone following the diary where all the upgrades and embellishments went on the model together with where they are featured in the diary itself - a very intensive project on its own as I can't remember where the heck they came in without trawling all the way back through it myself!Blushing
In order to create the 'before and after' shots I'm using a lot of screen saves from the official build alongside photos of the model, some of them are from the diary (where the angles etc match the instruction photos) and some will be specially taken on the completed model which means I'm leaving off the final assembly as the front and rear wings are getting in the way of some of the close up shots! Plus I have to find a clear space large enough to photograph the entire monster!
Here's a preview of what I have in mind, any thoughts will be very welcome!
(Oh, and I'm also working on a 3D and decal name-plate to finish it off too!)BigGrin

Back soon!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Upgrades Chassis Front.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#290 Posted : 04 July 2023 08:04:02

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I look forward to seeing your 'upgrades' project. It will be really interesting to see the comparison pics.
A fantastic build all round.Love
Markwarren
#291 Posted : 04 July 2023 08:17:42

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Wow, that really show the level of detail you’ve achieved. Just outstanding.Love Love Love

Mark
Plymouth57
#292 Posted : 16 July 2023 21:43:02

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Many thanks to Roy and Mark! It will be interesting to see the index as it comes together! Its taking some time to work through it as each comparison needs a new re-reading of the diary to find out just where the relevant changes were made - I go through and make a note of the subject ie, 'battery' and write down all the instalments where the battery appears and then have to go back again when I can't remember which part of the 'battery' came on which instalment! Onset of memory loss I think!BigGrin Anyway, its coming together slowly...
A very short update this time (I heard cheering!Blink )BigGrin

As shown in Photo 40, the windscreen comes in Pack 98. There are five little pegs moulded on the bottom of the windscreen, which are indicated by the arrows: one at the front centre, two at the rear and two towards the centre front. Unfortunately, despite the very well packaged part with its extra ‘air bags’ mine was damaged! The windscreen itself was fine (thank goodness) but both of the centre pegs had been broken off (and still in the poly bag). Photo 41 illustrates the front peg – looking at it close up there might even be some tiny cracking around that one too, whilst Photo 42 shows the missing peg (or rather it doesn’t!) Fortunately, it didn’t matter at all as the three remaining pegs are all that it needs to keep the windscreen tightly in place after pushing the three pegs down through the holes in the metal body. If the broken pegs had been all on one side it might have been a little trickier with probably some PVA or canopy type glue to keep the missing side down flush but thankfully no need for that here. Photos 43 and 44 show the windscreen fully home and locked in position.
The final part of the actual vehicle build comes in the next instalment, the replacement of the original push fit wheel hubs with a nice set of identical but magnetic ones designed to make changing the tyres over for the wet weather variety easier – a bit redundant as I decided on the wet tyres from the beginning of course, but I did like the idea of the easy fit magnetics so I changed them over!Cool
After that its just the pair of supports for the body shell and the ‘still in progress’ nameplate to complete this brilliant kit.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Body shell pic 11.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#293 Posted : 28 July 2023 22:21:29

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As mentioned last time, this is the final ‘on vehicle’ part of the build, just the ‘extra’ supports for displaying the body shell off the model to come after.Crying
Photo 1 shows the contents of Pack 109, which consists of a set of four silver plastic wheel hubs. The wheels already have a set of these of course but the first ones were push fits which, if you are doing a lot of tyre changing from dry slicks to wet treads which is a large part of the last phase of the instructions (not that I am changing tyres of course)BigGrin but if you were, those push fits are a pain in the proverbial to get off again! I ended up having to pull them off with long nosed pliers!Blink The replacements are much easier – they are magnetic, held on by magnetic attraction to the central screw bolt securing the wheels to the axles. The photo illustrates both front and rear hubs seen from both sides, with the outer details and the inner magnets. First of all they needed to be given the Mig Blue Black enamel wash treatment and this, as shown in Photo 2 was where those magnets came in really handy – to hold them in position for the wash to be applied I simply plonked them on the shaft end of a steel drill bit. The old ones had to be gripped by tweezers on their rear pins, these were much easier!Cool
Photo 3 shows the huge difference that simple application of enamel wash has on these parts. The wash was applied with a soft bristled Revell No.6 brush and literally just daubed over the hub, letting the wash collect on its own into the nooks and crannies to create the shadows around the raised details as seen here. As you can see, as well as picking out the detail, the silver ‘toy – like’ finish is replaced with a nicer looking metal appearance at the same time. The final two photos, Photo 4 and 5 shows the finished hub caps in place on the front wheel in Photo 4 and the larger rear wheel in Photo 5.
So now all that remains is to grab the final packets with those supports for the body shell and get that worktop cleared enough to pose the finished model for her photo shoot (I’ve finally got those poor plants out into hanging baskets so the clearance has begun!)BigGrin
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Replacement Magnetic Hub Caps pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#294 Posted : 29 July 2023 10:40:11

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Very nice work. Love Love I always use an enamel wash or a dark oil based paint on all my silver painted parts that are supposedly metal, makes it look more metallic rather than painted plastic.

Mark
Plymouth57
#295 Posted : 24 August 2023 18:45:43

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Many thanks for that Mark! You're right on that, most silver finishes look much better with a slight blue or sometimes brown 'tinge' to move the look from silver plastic to a more metallic hue!Cool

Despite the last instalment’s final words, there’s something else I nearly forgot has to go on first! Namely, the front and rear wings and the numeral decals on the nose!Blushing
Photo 1 illustrates the final appearance of the T4 minus the body shell and the aforementioned wings. I also took a few close up shots of various parts for the completed model photos before the wings get in the way to obstruct the views. The rear wing is a simple push fit onto the rear support and is pretty tight on its own with no need for any glue, Photos 2 to 4 show the wing fitted on with no extra parts other than the addition of the rivets painted chrome on the vertical fins and the DIY rub-down transfer of the ‘No Push’ sign on the rear shown in Photo 4.
The front wing however is a little more complicated to get on – the wing itself is fitted on to the nose cone, which is itself attached with three screws, two at the bottom which are ‘reverse screwed’ through the front suspension strut and a single one at the top centre which screws into the chassis front. Photo 5 shows the metal nose cone with one of the bottom fixing points arrowed, the top screw goes through the silver strut seen at the top of the nose cone. Its been so long since the wheels went on that, as seen in Photo 6, the strut may well be out of alignment with the chassis connector, (if you follow the actual official instructions, the nose cone and the wing were added way back in the construction – but as mine were re-painted with much more delicate paint finishes, that was asking for trouble!) Anyway, if the strut is off by even a tiny bit, you won’t get the fixing screw through the combined hole, so I used a thick steel pin, this one is part of an old dissection kit, hence the brass handle seen here in Photo 7, to push through the hole and wiggle the strut back into place. The screwing in of the first screw is seen in Photo 8 (you can see the gap still on the other side), getting the screwdriver in at that angle is not the easiest of jobs and you need a fairly small bit to prevent it jumping out of the screw as it turns!
Photo 9 shows the nose cone with both of the bottom screws fully home whilst Photo 10 illustrates just how the darned thing covers up all that extra detail on the braking system once the body shell is in place! I’ve been thinking (long) about the final base for this model, I’m looking at possibly using a piece of roofing felt to simulate a tarmac road surface and now I’m thinking of also insetting a couple sections of mirrored plasticard, one under the nose and another under the engine bay to reveal all the otherwise hidden detailing – well, we’ll see!BigGrin
Photo 11 shows the body shell back on top again with the rear wing in place plus the nose cone, I’ll still leaving the front wing off for the moment, attaching that one is easy enough, it just slots into the ‘T’ shaped hole on the nose and is secured with the single screw visible in the upside down pics – and it’s still very vulnerable to damage until the very end! One thing I did discover was that the car can no longer rotate right over on her front wheels – the nose cone gets in the way – however the rear wheels are still happy to revolve in the stand, the rear wing swings around underneath with plenty of clearance.
The final two photos, Photo 12 and 13 show the finishing touches to the body shell with the application of the numeral decals. One thing to remember with these is that they are NOT number 12’s but individual 1 and 2’s! I suspected they might be as I couldn’t make out any transparent carrier film between the numbers, which in this scale makes perfect sense. I just used plain water and not the usual decal fix or similar, and as it was cold water the decals took quite some time before they loosened up on the backing paper. Once in place they do helpfully move around allowing the careful alignment of getting the bottom of the numbers nice and straight whilst (trying) to ensure they both went on at the same angle! When ready, I’ll be giving the whole body shell a coat of car polish to shine it up and blend the numbers into the paint work too.
In the next instalment it’s back to those body supports and then the name plate for the base.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.



Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Wings and Decals pic 1.JPG
Wings and Decals pic 2.JPG
Wings and Decals pic 3.JPG
Wings and Decals pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Kev the Modeller
#296 Posted : 28 August 2023 11:50:35

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You've done an amazing job building this model Robin and your attention to adding the tiniest scratchbuilt details is staggering! As you near the finish line, I can only congratulate you on a fabulous achievement. A true museum quality build if ever I've seen one!

Very well done indeed! Drool ThumpUp

Kev

Per Ardua Ad Astra
mwb
#297 Posted : 28 August 2023 14:45:17

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I completely agree with you Kev. This is a masterpiece. Congratulations Robin on a superb build. Is it too soon to ask what's next on your bench (automotive wise)?
wyatt
goddo
#298 Posted : 28 August 2023 15:08:26

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Robin,
What a fantastic build!! Very well done.
I have been watching this one with interest and it amazes me how you guys get all the small details so right.
We can look forward to the next model now?
Chris
roymattblack
#299 Posted : 28 August 2023 15:29:06

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Absolutely mind-boggling work.
You must be incredibly pleased with all your work.
Very well done indeed sir.
Plymouth57
#300 Posted : 17 September 2023 22:29:05

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Many grateful thanks indeed to Kev, Wyatt, Chris and Roy!Blushing Blushing Blushing
This has been (and still is) a very enjoyable build experience and as said many times, completely out of my previous experience of modelling genres!Blink
As far as future models go, there is such a large build up of projects I have planned which have been pushed back whilst I tackled this monster. My poor old DelPrado Victory must get some work done soon before I forget how to work with wood! I have four projects which involve paper/card model kits being transformed into plasticard, two smallish, one medium and one I think is bigger than the Ferrari. On top of that there are two smallish dioramas to be got on with.
As far as other 'automotive' projects in the pipeline, there is one I have in mind although much (much) smaller than this one. Many decades ago I did make quite a few of those 1/32 scale vintage cars made by Airfix. I've still got them somewhere, maybe in the old garage workroom or stored in the old aviary (where everything went when the attic was cleared out for insulating back in 2001. If they're not there they are back in the attic - in which case God help me!Crying
What I would really like to do is to find them, pick one of them in the best condition and then try to get the same kit on ebay as long as its not one of the silly price ones Blink and build it again using all the skills and modern materials we have today to show just how much my modelling skills have improved over what must be fifty years or more!Blushing
As I said, I'll have to find the little blighters first so some of the other projects will probably come first. Anyway, I haven't finished this one yet!BigGrin

Ok then....
The body shell support cradle comes in two sections, the first part being the front cradle supplied in Pack 111 as shown in Photo 1. This is a very simple construction consisting of two ‘A’ frames, a top and bottom longitudinal support and a pack of screws. Funnily enough, this is the first instance in the entire kit where the screws are not given a designation letter (well I suppose they’re not actually a part of the car!)Flapper The two struts are fitted on in two different manners (but the same screws). As shown in Photo 2, the bottom strut slides into a rectangular slot where the screw hole lines up with a ninety degree tab moulded on to the A frame, indicated by the arrow. The two screws are then tightened up leaving the frame as seen in Photo 3. The top strut has a circular lug at both ends which locates into a round hole just below the top of the A frame and the screw is then inserted through the A and into the strut as shown in the completed front cradle in Photo 4.
Photo 5 shows the contents of Pack 112, namely the rear support cradle. The construction of this one is identical to the front except that it is a little wider across the struts. This is show to good effect in Photo 6 where the two cradles are side by side. The other difference between the two is in the ends at the top. The front cradle ends in a pair of round pegs whilst the rear one has a pair of semi-circular cut outs on the top (shown by the little yellow arrow). I had thought at first that the body shell would have simply sat on top of the cradles with no particular place to set them under it. However, the system has been really well thought out as shown in the following photos! Those two round pegs on the front cradle are designed to fit into the rear most of the semi circular cut outs in the nose section (which themselves fit over the front wheel struts) and are illustrated in Photo 7, they’ll only fit the rear cut outs though, the nose is too narrow to fit over the front ones!
The fitting point of the rear cradle is a little different to the front. As shown in Photo 8, the location is just in front of the ‘2’ on the number 12 down the rear sides of the body. However in the case of the rear, the actual support is in under the body shell as indicated by the arrow in Photo 9. Remember those semi circular cut outs on the top of the A frames? They are designed to fit over the protruding screw lugs shown in the insert in the bottom left, those lugs are actually there to allow the rear of the body to be securely screwed onto the chassis but provide a very handy support position too!Cool
Photos 10 and 11 show the body shell fitted on to the cradles from both top and bottom. Note that they do not actually ‘fit’ onto the shell in any tight fashion, the body simply rests on top of the supports when they are used, the upside down shot is only balanced in position!
With the cradles completed, there is only one last piece to finally fix in position – the very first section on the whole build; the front wing. In the official instructions, this was fitted on ages ago (all ready to be broken off again in the later stages!Blink ) Anyway, Photo 12 shows the nose cone upside down with the screw already sitting in its hole (I did put that one in way back, just so I wouldn’t lose it!) To fit on the front wing it was just a case of removing the screw, slotting the wing support into the rectangular hole in the nose cone and then replacing the screw back through the wing support and into the metal cone as shown in Photo 13.
As you can see in the final Photo 14, with both wings attached, this thing is BIG! She no longer fits onto the A3 cutting mat, she is now on a 3/4 A2 (I think that’s what you get adding an A4 to an A3). So all that remains now is to complete the name plate for the eventual base and Perspex cover and the final photo shoot of the completed model (and then the ‘appendix’ for the upgrades comparison to the basic kit which, all going well will hopefully include a set of wiring and tubing diagrams to help explain where all that spaghetti comes from and goes to! I could really have done with one of those myself!)Blushing
Until the next instalment then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Body shell cradle pic 1.JPG
Body shell cradle pic 2.JPG
Body shell cradle pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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