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Create and Decorate your Moominhouse Pack 8 Options
Markwarren
#1 Posted : 15 September 2023 17:02:34

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Joined: 04/01/2016
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Location: Northamptonshire, England
Issue 25

Contents

Cladding detail A,B,C & D, Drawer base and sides, Handles x 4, Front Drawer Parts.

Assembling The Stone Cladding
There are 3 types of cladding detail, cladding A has pegs on the back of one side, cladding B has holes on both sides, cladding D has pegs on both sides whilst cladding C is the longest of all parts and will fit on the front of the cellar. First, glue part A to part B as before, then fit D onto the holes of detail B.
Note: Make sure that when fitting the parts, the cladding stones line up with each other.
The magazine tells you to fit the assembly to the cellar base.
Note: As previously said in the last issue, I have NOT glued my cladding parts to the base, this is because I will be painting my cladding and to do so I will need this assembly separate for ease of painting without the need to mask parts off.

Assembling the Kitchen Shelf
Separate the front and back from the panel and sand smooth with sandpaper. Now glue the back to the drawer base and sides as shown. Next, glue the front of the drawers to the assemble.
Sandpaper all the parts smooth before painting the assembly along with the previous assemble we made in issue 24. Once it has dried, glue in place the 4 handles.

That completes this issue.

Markwarren attached the following image(s):
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Markwarren
#2 Posted : 15 September 2023 17:41:45

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 6,320
Points: 19,271
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Issue 26

Contents

Top Panel A, Top Panel B, additional strip, Watering can handle and nut.

Painting the Stone Wall
I decided to paint my wall cladding in a Northamptonshire stone effect. You don’t have to follow this method; you can just use the simple method shown in the book.
First, I primed the wall with grey primer paint. Using a brush, I then painted it with cream paint as shown. After this I then coloured certain stones with a yellow, red, and dark grey paint. You don’t have to be particular with getting the stones perfectly painted, the rougher it is the better the outcome. I then gave the whole cladding assembly a black and then a brown tracking wash and liberally brushed it all over. At this stage it looks awful, but allow this to dry a little, but not fully.
Using a mud/brown pigment power, I brushed the whole piece all over with it and then left it for 24 hours. Once it was dry, I then dry brushed it again with cream paint, brushing it in one direction from top to bottom to give it highlights. As you can see, the different colours you painted show up slightly give the stone a more natural look.

Once this had time to fully dry, I glued the stone cladding assembly to the bottom of the base with super glue.

Assembling of the Top Part of the Basement and Cellar Handle Watering Can

Take the panel B and attach the additional strip using wood glue.
Note: take care to glue the strip to the right side. It is glued on the opposite side to the lettering of the part.
Next, glue panel A to the other side of the strip. Take care to ensure the parts are glued in alignment with each other before it dries.

Once the assembly has dried, take the basement assembly, and apply wood glue to the top tabs and attach the assembly you’ve just made and fit the tabs into the holes. Make sure the central post fits into the square hole.
Note: This can be quite tricky, just make sure that all the tabs line up with the holes, if necessary, use a pair of tweezers to move the tabs in place.

Now take the watering can and push the back through the hole in the larger cladding part and secure it with the nut provided. Next, glue the tabs on the inside of the cladding part and push it onto the cellar assembly using firm pressure to ensure a tight fit. Finally, push on the grey plug from issue 25 on the inside of the cellar assembly.

That completes this issue.


Markwarren attached the following image(s):
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Markwarren
#3 Posted : 03 October 2023 15:46:04

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Joined: 04/01/2016
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Location: Northamptonshire, England
Issue 27 and 28 Part 1

Contents

Staircase lower and upper parts, treads 1 – 4, Vase, leaves, flowers, Flower pins x 10.
Staircase base, treads 4 – 8, Chandelier etched brass kit, wall lamp.

Building the Staircase.
This time round I will be building issues 27 and 28 together, rather than build them separately. The reason behind this was to build the staircase as one issue rather than in two parts split between the two issues, allowing me to paint it in one piece.
So let us get started. First, I gathered the staircase parts from both issues and glued them together, which was a very straight forward and a simple process. The reason for painting this is, in my opinion, I felt it was very plasticky and took away the overall look and feel of the rest of the build. Once I had glued all the parts together, I then filled in the gaps with Bondo filler. This was allowed to dry for an hour before I sanded it smooth. Next, I primed the part with grey primer, allowing this to dry fully before giving it a light sanding. The next stage, I gave the staircase two coats of spray white primer and allowed this to dry thoroughly overnight.
Finally, I painted the whole staircase with white acrylic paint using a washing up sponge to create a stipple effect. I gave this two coats of paint, drying the first coat with a hair dryer to quicken the drying process, whilst I had the paint in the pallet. The white acrylic paint must be of a thick consistency for this effect to work.

Now onto the steps. These are a cream flat plastic and although the instructions tell you to paint these with a brown paint, I felt they needed a little more to give them the wood effect this kit deserves. So, with my little rotary and glass etching tool, I lightly carved a wood grain into each plastic step. These were then primed with white paint. Using the same mixture of paint, I use on the wooden furniture; I mixed the light brown and wood grain paint together. These were given two coats of paint and allowed to dry before using a diluted black wash over each step. Finally, I gave them a coat of satin varnish to finish.

Once they were dry, I then fitted each step to the staircase as instructed. Each step has a number on the underside showing you where each one is positioned on the staircase. It does suggest using glue to hold them in place, however, these were a tight fit and this was not necessary.

There are eight steps between these two issues which you attach to the staircase, with the remaining steps to follow in the next instalment.
Markwarren attached the following image(s):
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Markwarren
#4 Posted : 15 November 2023 00:02:09

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Joined: 04/01/2016
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Location: Northamptonshire, England
Back to Issue 27

Assembling The Dining Room Flower Vase


In this section we will be making the flowers to go into the vase. You will definitely need a good magnifying glass, decent pair of tweezers, a kraft knife, green and yellow acrylic paint and some PVA glue, oh and a lot of patience.Crying

The first picture shows the parts that come with this issue. The pins are extremely small so take care when peeling off the Sellotape that holds them in the plastic case, 10 pins in all.
I placed the pins in some Blu tack, this would hold them in place while I painted the tops yellow with acrylic paint.
Whilst allowing these to dry, cut out the petals from the strip and make a small hole in the centre with a pin. This will make it much easier when fitting these on the stem of the pin.
When placing the petals on the pin, push it all the way to the top that has now been painted yellow. Dab a small blob of glue to the underside, using a pin or cocktail stick, allowing the glue to dry overnight. This will hold the petal in position.
Once dry, I held each petal with a pair of tweezers so I could paint the rest of the pin/stem green, again allowing them to dry overnight.
Now to do the flower arranging.BigGrin First, I placed the vase on a piece of Blu tack, this helped it to not move around whilst I placed the now ready flowers in the vase.
Before doing this, put some PVA glue in the vase, this will hold everything together when set.
Now carefully place the flowers in the vase, bending the wire on some and cutting the wire on others to get different heights and positions.
Once you are happy with the arrangement, cut out the leaves from the strip and carefully place these around the base of the vase and a couple in the centre. I only used 5 out of the six supplied.

Finally, once everything was dry, I used some green paint to give more colour to the leaves and some watered down blue to give a mottled effect to the petals, this is purely something I decided to do and is not part of the instructions.

Now pat yourselves on the back for making something so small and what seemed impossible to do. You can also put your eyes back to normal mode.Flapper Love

That completes this issue.

Markwarren attached the following image(s):
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Markwarren
#5 Posted : 16 November 2023 20:51:18

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 6,320
Points: 19,271
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Back to Issue 28

Assembling The Dining Room Chandelier


Cut out the etched brass carefully using a kraft knife. I used a small metal file, to file any spurs.
The next step is to bend 2 of the chandelier arms to 60 degrees. I used a photo-etch bender, picture 2. If you do not have one of these, then use a set-square or ruler as stated in the magazine. Make sure you line up the fold line and carefully bend upwards to 90 degrees making sure you have an even bend. Then finally bend it to a 60-degree angle, a pair of small pliers might be handy for this.
The result is in picture 3. Now proceed with the other arm in the same way.

Now take the round top and bend the diamond decorations down, twisting them so they are at different angles, picture 4 and the result in picture 5.
Picture 6 shows all the parts ready to assemble.
This is where I differed from the magazine, first test fit the parts by placing one of the side arms you bent into the V on the round top part as shown in picture 7. Test fit the other side arm along with the centre flat arm, which has the round attachment at the top, running through the centre of the long slot in the top part. When you are satisfied that you are happy with the fit, place the centre arm flat on a surface. Glue in position one of the side arms as shown in picture 8, positioning them, so the two bottom parts line up. Allow this to dry before attaching the other arm on the opposite side in the same way, although you won’t be able to hold it flat on the surface. Once the glue is set, push the assembly into the top circular part. The side arm parts should stick through the top by around 3mm. Using a cocktail stick, apply a dab of super glue to the joints on the top as shown in picture 9.
Next, carefully bend the diamond decorations on the arms as you did with the top part earlier, using a pair of tweezers, picture 10.

The assembly is now complete as shown in picture 11.

In the next issue we will be hanging the lights on.

That completes this issue.
Markwarren attached the following image(s):
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